Friday, March 29, 2019

By the numbers: Here are more interesting 2018 facts and figures

Tana Kass, advanced registered nurse practitioner, and the rest of
Promise Community Health Center's medical provider team saw
3,293 patients for 8,305 medical visits during the past year.

by Derrick Vander Waal

SIOUX CENTER, IOWAPromise Community Health Center played a big role in making the communities of northwest Iowa healthier in the past year.

Many of the ways that Promise made a positive impact were presented in its 2019 Annual Report that was distributed this week.

To review the report, visit this link.

But, here are additional facts and figures from 2018 that you will find interesting:

Certified nurse midwife Belinda Lassen,
along with Pam Hulstein, CNM, provided
222 women prenatal care during 2018.
The also attended 32 home births.
  • Not only did patients come to Promise from 144 ZIP codes during 2018, but Promise drew at least 15 patients from 33 of those towns.
  • The farthest distance away of those 33 towns was Storm Lake with 34 patients traveling 75 miles to Sioux Center. Another 44 patients traveled 60 miles from Spencer.
  • 66 percent of Promise’s patients came from Sioux County, with the remaining 34 percent coming from towns in other area counties.
  • Many of Promise’s 4,814 patients received multiple services during the year. A breakdown: 3,293 patients were provided medical care; 2,281 received dental care; 371 vision care; 73 behavioral health care.
  • Of the medical patients, 222 women were provided prenatal care, with 32 home births attended by Promise’s certified nurse midwives.
  • Promise served a lot of young families: 79 percent of its patients were 40 years old or younger, including 43 percent being 17 and younger. The percentage of children served was nearly double the state and national average of 22 percent for community health centers.
  • About half of Promise’s patients were of Hispanic/Latino ethnicity.
  • 46 percent of Promise’s patients were best served in a language other than English.
  • A combined 81 percent of Promise’s patients were uninsured (36 percent) or covered by Medicaid (45 percent). But, Promise welcomes all patients and accepts all forms of private health insurance as well.
  • Promise provided high-quality care – improving in 12 of 16 clinical and dental quality measures and exceeding the state and national averages of community health centers for most of those measures. During 2018, Promise was named a Health Center Quality Leader for placing in the top 30 percent among CHCs nationwide for clinical quality measures.
Promise Community Health Center of Sioux Center is a Federally Qualified Health Center serving the northwest corner of Iowa. Promise provides medical, prenatal, dental, vision, behavioral health and family planning services. To learn more, visit www.promisechc.org and watch this video. To read more Promise news, visit promisechcnews.blogspot.com.


2019 ANNUAL REPORT:

To learn more, view Promise CHC’s 2019 Annual Report online at: https://www.promisechc.org/webres/File/2019%20Annual%20Report.pdf





Friday, March 1, 2019

Promise offers $30 gift card for completing FIT colorectal cancer test

It's "Dress in Blue Day!" Promise Community Health Center staff dressed in blue
today (Friday, March 1) to recognize National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month
and to encourage people to get screenings to detect and prevent colorectal cancer.

by Derrick Vander Waal

SIOUX CENTER, IOWA – Don’t assume you can’t get colorectal cancer. Don’t assume you’re too young or too healthy. Don’t assume that colorectal cancer can’t be prevented. Don’t assume that screening is scary or difficult. Don’t assume that you can’t beat colorectal cancer.

Don’t assume you’re alone.

Assumptions and misconceptions are being challenged for the “Don’t Assume” campaign during National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month in March.

Colorectal cancer, which is cancer of the colon or rectum, is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Faith Schiltz, advanced registered nurse practitioner (ARNP) at Promise Community Health Center in Sioux Center, said the good news, however, is precancerous polyps can be detected before people even get colorectal cancer. Therefore, if caught early, colorectal cancer is highly preventable and treatable.

She said everyone 50 years and older should be screened on regular intervals.

“It’s so important to make sure that we’re following through on recommendations and that you’re talking with your medical provider and also talking with your family – knowing what your family history is,” Schiltz said. “Was there an immediate family member who had cancer? And, if they had colon cancer, how old were they? In giving that information to your provider, together you can make a very good sound decision on when to screen and how to screen.”

Promise again is placing a high emphasis on getting as many people screened as possible for colorectal cancer.

To encourage people to get screened, Promise has a limited number of $30 Casey’s General Store gift cards to give to patients who complete a home stool test for colorectal cancer. The promotion will run through April 15.

Anyone who is between the ages of 50-75 and who has not had a colonoscopy in the last 10 years or has not completed a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) in the last 12 months will be eligible to receive the gift card.

All they have to do is receive a FIT kit from Promise, complete the test and mail it back.

FIT has been proven to be an effective screening tool for colorectal cancer. The noninvasive test, which is completed at home, detects hidden blood in a person’s stool. The test should be completed every year. For established Promise patients, they can call to have a FIT kit mailed to them or arrange to pick one up. For new patients, they are encouraged to schedule an appointment with one of Promise’s providersDr. Del Lassen and nurse practitioners Tana Kass, Amy Waterman and Schiltz – to receive the FIT kit.

The FIT kit includes detailed instructions and materials that patients need to collect the samples and mail them back to Promise.

“We will test it and notify you whether it’s normal or abnormal. If it’s abnormal, we’ll give you recommendation of what the next step is,” Schiltz said. “That’s pretty easy. You can do it at home.”

FIT is a low-cost test. Most insurance policies cover most or all of the cost. For low-income people who do not have insurance or their insurance does not cover the test, Promise’s sliding-fee scale will reduce the cost.

For more information or to receive a FIT kit, call Promise at 712-722-1700.

Promise Community Health Center of Sioux Center is a Federally Qualified Health Center serving the northwest corner of Iowa. Promise provides medical, prenatal, dental, vision, behavioral health and family planning services. To learn more, visit www.promisechc.org and watch this video. To read more Promise news, visit promisechcnews.blogspot.com.


WATCH TO LEARN MORE:

Faith Schiltz, advanced registered nurse practitioner (ARNP) at Promise CHC, shares what colorectal cancer is and how, when and why people should get screened in this video. The video also can be found on YouTube at: https://youtu.be/Xno_MsTJtrY.



In this video, Schiltz shares how the FIT home stool test works. It’s easy and effective. The video also can be found on YouTube at: https://youtu.be/SyZoRlEg7hU.



WHAT IS COLORECTAL CANCER?

Colorectal cancer is cancer of the colon or rectum.

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 140,000 Americans are diagnosed with colorectal cancer every year, and more than 50,000 people die from it. Colorectal cancer affects men and women equally.

The cancer usually starts from precancerous polyps, or growths, in the colon or rectum. The colon is the large intestines, and the rectum is the passageway that connects the colon to the anus. Over time, the polyps can turn into cancer. Screening testsranging from a home fecal immunochemical test (FIT) to a colonoscopy – can find precancerous polyps so that they can be removed before turning into cancer. The screenings are important because they can detect polyps or cancer before people experience any symptoms.

More than 90 percent of colorectal cancers occur in people ages 50 or older, according to the CDC. Some people have higher risk factors.

To learn more about colorectal cancer, visit these resources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and American Cancer Society.