Monday, November 11, 2019

Gesink hired as Promise Marketing and Public Relations Coordinator


SIOUX CENTER – Kris Gesink has been transitioning into the Marketing and Public Relations
Coordinator at Promise Community Health Center.

Gesink is excited to join the Promise team. “When I was offered this opportunity to come on board with the Promise team as the Marketing and Public Relations Coordinator, I was thrilled to be a part of a mission I believe in. The staff at Promise Community Health are amazing, the passion they have for their jobs and their patients is inspiring.”

Gesink joins the Promise Community Health team with years of marketing and communication experience. “Working at an ad agency for 10 plus years has really helped me see the whole picture for marketing. Taking that knowledge and using it to help better inform people about their health is so exciting. I'm anxious to share all the amazing services offered here at Promise, from medical to dental and behavior health to outreach, it will be a fun challenge for me.”

Gesink started her new role on October 28, 2019.

Thursday, October 10, 2019

Rensink to be presented 2019 Addink Community Service Award

by Sharon Vermeer

Pastor Deb Rensink, 
2019 Addink Community Service 
Award Honore
SIOUX CENTER, IOWA - Promise Community Health Center is pleased to announce that their 2019 Addink Community Service Award will be presented to Pastor Deb Rensink of Whispers of Love, Hope and Joy. This award, which recognizes and honors an exceptional individual or family that makes volunteerism and community service a way of life, will be presented to Deb at the annual Promise Community Health Center’s An Evening of Promise” Celebration and Fundraiser on Thursday, Oct. 17, at Terrace View Event Center in Sioux Center.
Rensink is passionate about people. A former RN, Deb felt called to ministry, and completed her Master of Divinity with RCA from Western Seminary in 2014. Unsure of which way God was calling her, she waited on Him and prayed for direction.  In June of 2016 three encounters helped make her decision. “The first week, (husband) Mark and I went to a fundraiser in Alton,” Deb explained. “A woman attending found out I was a pastor, and started sharing with me about emotional abuse she had suffered. She had spent time with her pastor, but felt that she hadn’t been heard. She really felt injured from that encounter. A week later, Mark and I had gone on a bike ride and were putting away our bikes when a woman walking down the sidewalk stopped to talk with us. She shared about a family member who had been abused. She told me she didn’t know how to navigate through what had happened, or how to find healing for the family member and herself. The third week we had gone out with two other couples. One began to share about a family member in an abusive relationship. Because they felt unheard and unsupported by their pastor, they had started to back off of their church. I knew God was calling me to work with abuse. But I didn’t know anything about it! I grew up in a warm, loving home and always felt supported. I decided to see where it would go, and just trust.”
In May of 2017, Deb stepped into a volunteer pastor role with the Family Crisis Center, working through the non-profit she developed, Whispers of Love, Hope and Joy, which allows Deb to go in as a volunteer and work with abused people.  “I felt very inadequate!” She laughed ruefully, “I wasn’t sure what my job was going to look like but I felt strongly convicted that this is where I was called to be.” Besides being trained as a domestic violence advocate, Deb has completed iPEC training (Institute for Professional Excellence in Coaching), and is a Certified professional coach, as well as a master practitioner as an Energy Leadership Index: a way of measuring how we engage in our day to day lives and how we react to stress. All of that training has helped her understand that the greatest need that abused people have is to believe their story, because that is the beginning of healing. 
Deb goes in sometimes to just be present with the people she works with, and provides a safe, calm, healing and prayerful presence. “I just allow them to speak,” Deb explained, “because for some of them they HAVEN’T been allowed to talk, and they need to find their voice again. I don’t try to fix the problem: that’s often not what they need from me. I’m just present with them wherever I find them.”  She holds to the guiding principles she has developed: offering compassion to the broken-hearted, healing for the hurting, dignity in the darkness, and hope for the hopeless.
Because the Family Crisis Center covers seventeen counties, Deb does a lot of driving, providing rides to the women in the program, who often don’t have vehicles, or whose vehicles need repair. That need is what brought her to her latest venture. 
“A few years ago, I was approached by Brad Vermeer, who is in an area Men’s Bible Study, about doing maintenance on vehicles for women who need help,” explained Rensink. “The timing was wrong. But last year I was struggling with how to help the abused women I work with, and remembered their offer. I reached out to them, and they agreed to help with the project.”
Last year was the first time Whispers of LHJ, Atlas and the men’s Bible study group put on the event. Twenty-two vehicles were serviced at Rensink’s farm, while the women were given a tutorial by Bob Bruxvoort on how to take care of their vehicles. Vice-President Ashley Schuiteman was on hand for the event. “We wanted the women to feel empowered when they left us, and know that they would be safe in their vehicles,” she said. “It was very humbling to see some of the cars. We realized how blessed we are to have men in our lives who aren’t abusive and make sure our vehicles are in good shape.” 
October 12 is the day designated for the event this year. The group is looking forward to servicing twenty-four vehicles. Thanks to donations of oil from Co-op Gas and Oil, and oil filters donated by Arnold Motor Supply, and a $2,500 grant from America’s Farmers Grow Communities (sponsored by the Bayer Fund), the money from the grant will be used to provide winter survival kits to the survivors of abuse. “It’s great to see the way survivors have connected and how people are engaging with each other through this event and others,” Rensink said. “We can’t do life in isolation. When women leave a bad situation, they often lose their support network and need to find a new community. Even though what they go through is so horrific, they need to know God knows their heart, and all of the pain will pass. With God’s help, we can help them build a better life.”
Rensink was nominated for the award by Kelsey Vande Berg of the Family Crisis Center. Vande Berg is grateful for the support she provides to their clients and staff. “Pastor Deb frequently hosts dinners at her home for holidays, since many of our clients may not have somewhere to go. She answers phones at our main office weekly, which is a huge need we have right now! She helps clients move out of housing when they're ready to go, tapping into her connections in the community to get trailers, moving companies, or just more people to help them move. Pastor Deb has even opened up her home to clients when needed. Pastor Deb fills so many roles that our staff are not always able to fill, due to time or budgetary restraints. She is an integral part of our team, and it's hard to believe it's largely volunteer work!”
“Volunteers bring together communities and enrich the organization and people they serve,” said Amy Kleinhesselink, co-CEO for Promise. “Promise Community Health Center recognizes a volunteer each year with the Addink award as a way to express our gratitude and honor to all those who give their time.”
The Addink Community Service Award was created in 2012 to recognize one individual or family who has made a positive impact on the community through volunteerism. The award is named after Ken and Barb Addink of Sioux Center in recognition of their lifetime of involvement in community activities, including the establishment of dental services as Promise.


PAST ADDINK AWARD HONOREES:
Here are the past Addink Community Service Award honorees:
·                     Ken and Barb Addink – 2012;
·                     Tom and Marlene Van Holland – 2013;
·                     Jean Ellis – 2014;
·                     Rob and Sharon Schelling – 2015;
·                     Rod and Jayne Hofmeyer – 2016;
·                     Barbara Top 2017;
·                     Judy Hauswald – 2018.

Promise Community Health Center of Sioux Center is a Federally Qualified Health Center serving the northwest corner of Iowa. Promise provides medical, prenatal, dental, vision, behavioral health and family planning services. To learn more, visit www.promisechc.org and watch this video. To read more Promise news, visit promisechcnews.blogspot.com.

Tuesday, August 27, 2019

Promise seeks nominations for 2019 Addink Community Service Award

SIOUX CENTER – Promise Community Health Center of Sioux Center seeks nominations for this year’s Addink Community Service Award.

The deadline to submit a nomination is Sept. 16.

The award will be presented during Promise Community Health Center’s annual “An Evening of Promise” Celebration and Fundraiser on Thursday, Oct. 17, at Terrace View Event Center in Sioux Center. The honoree will be notified prior to the event and will be recognized publicly.

“Volunteers bring together communities and enrich the organization and people they serve,” said Amy Kleinhesselink, co-CEO for Promise. “Promise Community Health Center recognizes a volunteer each year with the Addink award as way to express our gratitude and honor to all those who give their time.”

The Addink Community Service Award was created in 2012 to recognize one individual, or family, who has made a positive impact on the community through volunteerism. The award is named after Ken and Barb Addink of Sioux Center in recognition of their lifetime of involvement in community activities. In particular, their volunteer service was instrumental in establishing dental services at Promise.
The award recognizes and honors an exceptional individual or family that makes volunteerism and community service a way of life. The award recipient exemplifies the best in volunteeringa sense of caring and responsibility for others, for the betterment of the local community and for the greater world beyond. 
Specifically, the winner will be someone who:

    Gives freely and unselfishly of their time to community activities;

    Inspires others to serve and acts as a role model;

    Has a positive impact upon the direction and success of community projects, programs or individuals;

    Improves the lives of others.

Anyone can nominate a person, or family, for the award. Anyoneexcept for a Promise employee, current board member or immediate family member of an employee or board member is eligible to receive the award. Nominations will remain on file for three years.

To fill out an online nomination form, visit bit.ly/AddinkAward19. To have a nomination form emailed or mailed to you, contact Rebecca Baatz at 712-722-1700 or rbaatz@promisechc.org. A form also is available at www.promisechc.org.



Promise Community Health Center of Sioux Center is a Federally Qualified Health Center serving northwest Iowa. Promise provides medical, prenatal, dental, vision, behavioral health and family planning services. To learn more, visit www.promisechc.org.

  

SAVE THE DATE:

Promise Community Health Center’s 11th annual “An Evening of Promise” Celebration and Fundraiser is slated for Thursday, Oct. 17, at Terrace View Event Center in Sioux Center. The event will feature entertainment by highly rated dueling piano group, Dueling Duo, a catered dinner and presentation of the Addink Community Service Award. Ticket sales will run through October 14. To purchase tickets online, visit promiseevent2019.eventbrite.com.



PAST HONOREES:

The past recipients of the Addink Community Service Award are:

    Ken and Barb Addink – 2012;

    Tom and Marlene Van Holland – 2013;

    Jean Ellis – 2014;

    Rob and Sharon Schelling – 2015;

    Rod and Jayne Hofmeyer – 2016;

    Barbara Top – 2017.

    Judy Hauswald – 2018.

Friday, August 2, 2019

Join us for second annual Healthy Heroes Run & Walk on Sept. 21

by Derrick Vander Waal

SIOUX CENTER, IOWA – Promise Community Health Center and Sioux Center Health want everyone in the community to become a “healthy hero.”

That’s why they are joining forces again to put on the second annual Healthy Heroes 5K Race / 1-mile Family Fun Walk on Saturday, Sept. 21. This year, the event will be held at Children’s Park in Sioux Center.

The 5-kilometer race (3.1 miles) is slated for 8:30 a.m. The free 1-mile Family Fun Walk, or run, will start at 9:30 a.m. A health fair featuring an array of interactive games and activities will be offered 9-11 a.m.

Register online for the event at: HealthyHeroes2019.eventbrite.com. People also can stop in and register in person at Promise.

Everyone in the community is invited to attend – no matter your fitness level.

“Promise and Sioux Center Health believe that a healthy, vibrant community is only possible if we have healthy and vibrant families,” said Stephanie Van Ruler, population health manager at Promise and one of the event coordinators. “Early prevention and early access to education and health resources are keys to building a better tomorrow. There are many building blocks that bring about a flourishing and healthy community. This event is just one of many blocks that helps build the foundation for the future.”

Healthy Heroes is being held during September for National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month as a way to promote awareness about the dangers of childhood obesity and the positive effects of wellness for both children and adults.

Therefore, the timing and purpose is to promote healthy lifestyles – fitting with the theme.

“Choosing health is a super power,” Van Ruler said. “Starting healthy habits early on in life sets our kids up for success and health as they grow.”

The 5K run will be timed, and metals will be awarded for the top 3 places in each age division. The registration fee for the 5K is $15 for adults and $10 for youth 17 years old and younger. Participants also will receive a complimentary event T-shirt.

The 1-mile event will be free. The route will include interactive activity stops hosted by local physical therapy and wellness personnel, including obstacle courses, balance activities and more. Runners, walkers and children riding strollers are welcome. Any family who has two or more participants will be able to enter a drawing for a family summer pass to the Siouxnami Water Park in Sioux Center.

Participants also are encouraged to dress up again as a superhero to fit the theme of the event. A prize for “Best Dressed” will be awarded again.

Along with the 5K and 1-mile events, several organizations in the community will offer various educational and fun activities for families, including car-seat checks, storybook walk, superhero photo booth, spray tattoos, 5-2-1-0 healthy habits, nutrition information and more. Everyone who completes a bingo card for the booths will be entered into a drawing for a grand prize.

Van Ruler said the inaugural event was “a huge success,” so the organizers are excited about what this year will bring.

“Walking around and watching the event unfold was surreal,” she said. “There was laughter, chatter and squeals of excitement – the sounds of kids learning, laughing and growing together. We learned a lot from the first year and hope that this year is even better than last year.”


AT A GLANCE:
What: Healthy Heroes Run & Walk
When: Saturday, September, 21
8:30 a.m. – 5K Race
9:30 a.m. – 1-mile Family Fun Walk
9-11 a.m. – Health Fair
Where: Children’s Park; Sioux Center, IA
How: Register online at HealthyHeroes2019.eventbrite.com. Or, stop in or call Stephanie Van Ruler at Promise Community Health Center.
Why: Promote healthy lifestyles for people in community.
For more info, contact: Stephanie Van Ruler, Promise CHC, at svanruler@promisechc.org or Krystal Vander Pol, Sioux Center Health, at krystal.vanderpol@siouxcenterhealth.org.

Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Ney will serve women as certified nurse midwife at Promise CHC

by Derrick Vander Waal

SIOUX CENTER, IOWA – Kari Ney has always held to the core value that women’s health care should be provided on an individual basis.

She believes the midwifery model of care does that best.

But it’s more than a philosophy for her; she has experienced it. For the past five years, she has worked side-by-side with certified nurse midwives Belinda Lassen and Pam Hulstein at Promise Community Health Center in Sioux Center as a registered nurse.

Kari Ney who has served as a registered nurse at
Promise Community Health Center since 2013,
has completed her education and training to
become a certified nurse midwife. She will
begin seeing patients in that role at Promise
 Promise during September. Her hours will
be on Thursdays and Fridays.


Now, Ney has taken that a step farther by completing her American Midwifery Certification Board exam to become a certified nurse midwife.

She will begin seeing patients at Promise during September after her licensing is completed in Iowa and South Dakota. Her hours will be on Thursdays and Fridays, which will increase access to midwifery services at Promise to five days per week.

“The meaning of midwife is ‘with woman,’” Ney said. “I aim to work together with women throughout their lives to meet their goals for optimal health. My desire is to walk alongside women and guide them as they go through all the stages from puberty through menopause.”

Ney has dedicated her career to health care.

After graduating from Western Christian High School in Hull in 1995, she attended Dordt College in Sioux Center for three years. She then went on to Western Iowa Tech Community College in Sioux City, where she earned her associate degree in nursing in 2000. She worked as a nurse at Avera McKennan Hospital and University Health Center in Sioux Falls, SD, 2000-01, and at Sioux Center Health, 2000-15.

She has served as a registered nurse at Promise since 2013, including the last five years as part of the midwifery team. Meanwhile, she enrolled in the certified nurse midwife education program at Frontier Nursing University in Hyden, KY, in 2016. She completed her preceptorship training at Sanford Women’s Health Plaza in Sioux Falls and at Promise and earned her master of science in nursing degree this spring.

Ney is excited about the opportunity to take her service at Promise to new level.

“I love the diversity of clients we care for,” she said. “I love that Promise has supported our midwifery program so we are able to provide an option in prenatal care that is different from a medical approach for normal, healthy pregnancy. I believe women seek out the midwife model of care because it is an empowering approach to health care that is tailored to meet the needs of each woman. I am excited to be part of this program.”

As she prepares for her new role, Ney is most eager about “building relationships with women in the community and partnering with them.”

“I am excited to meet the needs of women in the clinic but also provide another needed resource for women seeking midwifery care for women’s health, pregnancy and birth services,” Ney said.

Promise Community Health Center of Sioux Center is a Federally Qualified Health Center serving the northwest corner of Iowa. Promise provides medical, prenatal, dental, vision, behavioral health and family planning services. To learn more, visit www.promisechc.org and watch this video. To read more Promise news, visit promisechcnews.blogspot.com.


NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING:
In addition to becoming a certified nurse midwife, Kari Ney became a trained instructor in the Billings Ovulation Method® of natural family planning and implemented the program at Promise Community Health Center earlier this year.

Billings Ovulation Method is a scientific method of fertility management that has been used successfully by millions of women around the world to help them become pregnant, postpone pregnancy or have a better knowledge of their own fertility.

She encourages any interested couples to contact her at Promise for the individualized education.


MORE ABOUT KARI:
Kari Ney and her husband, Jake, live in Hull and have four children, Cory, 16; Ethan, 14; Jesse, 12; and Ava, 8. In her spare time, she enjoys sewing, reading, gardening, traveling and playing violin.



Thursday, July 25, 2019

Promise CHC awarded $600,000 grant for Population Health Program

by Derrick Vander Waal

SIOUX CENTER, IOWA – Promise Community Health Center will take its nurse health coaching service to the next level in establishing a Population Health Program.

The project will focus on chronic disease care management and preventative health – both with its established patients and within the community.

To make the enhanced program possible, Promise has been awarded a $600,000 federal grant over three years from the Small Health Care Provider Quality Improvement Program of the Health Resources and Services Administration. The project will take effect on Aug. 1.

Stephanie Van Ruler,
population health manager


Stephanie Van Ruler, who was hired two years ago as Promise’s first nurse health coach, will serve as the project director and has been promoted to the role of Population Health Program manager at the health center.

“Promise has long been committed to the long-term success of its patients,” Van Ruler said. “The transition to a Population Health Program through the funding of the grant will provide a structured, team-based approach to chronic disease management and enhanced access for primary care and preventative care. The Population Health Program will place a focus on education to ensure services provided address language, cultural and socioeconomic barriers.”

Van Ruler said Promise’s implementation of the nurse health coaching program has resulted in positive health outcomes for patients during the past two years. She noted that Promise’s health providers deliver high-quality care to patients, but the nurse health coaches can take that a step farther by offering the ongoing, one-on-one teaching and support that patients need to overcome barriers to health and manage chronic conditions such as diabetes.

The Population Health Program not only will increase and enhance the nurse health coaching provided to patients, but the project will expand outreach and education into the community.

“The Population Health Program will allow for a continued increase in set standards, improvement in care and improved health outcomes of all persons living in rural northwest Iowa,” Van Ruler said.

The grant will allow Promise to hire two new full-time positions: a nurse health coach and a patient navigator. The patient navigator will free up the nurse health coaches to focus more directly on patients’ needs and care.

In addition, Promise’s part-time nurse health coaches, Kim Davelaar and Vicki Schrock, will continue to serve patients. Kendra Borchers, clinical pharmacist for Promise, will serve as resource in caring for patients with chronic disease using her expertise in medications. Amy McAlpine, data and compliance specialist, will track patient and project outcomes.

Through the project, Promise will further its mission “to provide accessible, holistic care that adapts to the needs of the community to improve the well-being of all persons.”

“Promise believes that all persons should be empowered and have equal rights to living a healthy, vibrant life,” Van Ruler said. “Through a structured, collaborative Population Health Program, Promise can strive to make health equity a reality for persons living in rural Iowa.”

Promise Community Health Center of Sioux Center is a Federally Qualified Health Center serving the northwest corner of Iowa. Promise provides medical, prenatal, dental, vision, behavioral health and family planning services. To learn more, visit www.promisechc.org and watch this video. To read more Promise news, visit promisechcnews.blogspot.com.


INTERESTED IN SERVING?
If you are interested in serving as a nurse health coach or patient navigator, visit Promise Community Health Center’s careers page on its website to review the job descriptions at: www.promisechc.org/careers/.

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Consider all aspects of your wellness so you can become truly well

Note: This column was published in the July 11 edition of The Sioux County Capital Democrat for the Stay Healthy! feature. It was posted with permission.


by Stephanie Van Ruler, RN, nurse health coach
Promise Community Health Center

Holistic is a word that is often heard being discussed around play groups, girls nights, kids events and activities, or over a cup of coffee at the local Town Square, to name a few. Yet, do we understand and grasp what this word encompasses? Do we know what it means and the value it holds in our work, in our relationships, in our families and in our health?

Stephanie Van Ruler, RN,
Nurse Health Coach


I believe there is importance and value in pausing here to define the word holistic. Holistic is the comprehension of the parts of something as intimately interconnected and explicable only by reference to the whole.

As a Christian, this is exactly what we believe. We believe that God has woven together the tiniest of molecules and cells that are all connected, all needing the others around it to make up the whole personuniquely different, complex and yet all connected. If something occurs in one part of our body, our cells respond, and the connection and response can be found throughout all parts of our body. Think back to your high school or college biology class, and reflect on how incredible the cells in our body are, dividing and reproducing. While you go about your day, your cells are hard at work to allow you to go to work, go for a run, make breakfast, care for others and so much more!

Holistic care in medicine is characterized by the treatment of the whole person, accounting for the mental and social factors, rather than just the symptoms of a disease. To be well is not just the absence of disease in one’s cells, it is the care of five major parts of usour physical, emotional, social, spiritual and intellectual wellness.

Slowing down to care for the emotional, spiritual, and intellectual wellness can be challenging at times. We live fast-paced, busy lives, often planning and cramming things into our day down to the minute. When something hurts or when we fall ill, whether it be with a cough and sore throat or diabetes and high cholesterol, we want the physical fixed quickly. We want the pain gone or the disease cured as we are already moving on to the next thing on our list. However, when we consider the whole and unique person rather than just the symptoms, we will see a return to health and a maintenance of that health.

Take for example the impact of stress on our physical well-being. When our body feels stress, our nervous system responds. Floods of stress hormones are released throughout our bodies, raising our heart rate, making us breathe faster, and increasing our blood pressure and our blood sugar levels. Our bodies can respond to the stressor and then go back to baseline when the stressor is gone. But what happens when the stressor or multiple stressors are present for days, months, even years?

As a health coach, it is imperative that I look at the whole persontheir emotional, social, spiritual and intellectual wellness in addition to their physical wellness. This facilitates and allows people to have the best possible health outcomes.

Take time today to pause and reflect on your own life and well-being. What part of the whole are you not caring for? What physical symptoms are you feeling today because of that lack of care? Are you anxious or irritable because the bills are adding up and you lost your job last week? Talk to someone. Take a walk, talk to a counselor, meet a friend for coffee just to let it all out. Are you feeling inner discontentment or anger over broken relationships or family turmoil? Seek out spiritual fulfillment through song, scripture, meditation, or time in creation doing what you love.

None of these activities alone can “fix” the disruption of health and wellness in your body, but together each part can bring you closer to being well.

Promise Community Health Center of Sioux Center is a Federally Qualified Health Center serving the northwest corner of Iowa. Promise provides medical, prenatal, dental, vision, behavioral health and family planning services. To learn more, visit www.promisechc.org and watch this video. To read more Promise news, visit promisechcnews.blogspot.com.

Monday, July 15, 2019

Schiltz shares ‘ABCDE’s and F of Skin Spots’ for UV Safety Month

by Derrick Vander Waal

SIOUX CENTER, IOWA – Do you know what to look for in your skin spots to detect potential skin cancer?

Faith Schiltz – a nurse practitioner for Promise Community Health Center in Sioux Center, who also previously worked in dermatology – uses the “ABCDE’s rule” and her own “F” as a way to educate her patients about how to examine their own skin to spot potential melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer.

For UV Safety Month, Schiltz shares that education with you in this video:




Here’s a quick-glance review of the “ABCDE’s and F of Skin Spots”:
Faith Schiltz, ARNP

A = Asymmetry. Is one half of the skin spot is unlike the other half?

B = Border. Is the border irregular? Iis it scalloped or a poorly defined border?

C = Color. Is it varied from one area to another; does it have more than one or two colors, does it have shades of tan, brown or black, white, red or blue/grey?

D = Diameter. Is it bigger than 6 millimeters – the size of a pencil eraser?

E = Evolving. Does a mole or skin lesion look different than it used to? Is it changing in size, shape and or color? Is it growing up.

F = Funny-looking. If you notice a spot that looks different from any other spots that you have, or if it itches or bleeds, you should make an appointment to have it evaluated.

In addition to examining your own skin monthly, Schiltz says people should have their skin examined once a year by a medical provider and more often if you have a personal or family history of skin cancer.

Promise Community Health Center of Sioux Center is a Federally Qualified Health Center serving the northwest corner of Iowa. Promise provides medical, prenatal, dental, vision, behavioral health and family planning services. To learn more, visit www.promisechc.org and watch this video. To read more Promise news, visit promisechcnews.blogspot.com.


TIPS TO PROTECT YOUR SKIN:
For Faith Schiltz tips and tidbits on how to protect your skin from damage from UV rays, visit: promisechcnews.blogspot.com/2019/07/get-skinny-on-protecting-yourself-in.html.


TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT:
Promise Community Health Center is open during the following hours: 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Thursday and 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Promise at 712-722-1700 or visit Promise's website at https://www.promisechc.org/services/set-up-an-appointment.aspx.

Monday, July 1, 2019

Get the SKINny on protecting yourself in sun for UV Safety Month


by Derrick Vander Waal

SIOUX CENTER, IOWA – People believe a lot of myths when it comes to being safe in the sun.

And they take a lot of risks when they bathe in ultraviolet rays as a result.

Faith Schiltz – a nurse practitioner for Promise Community Health Center in Sioux Center, who previously worked in dermatology – hopes to debunk many of those misconceptions and encourage better habits for healthier skin and to help prevent skin cancer.

Here are Faith’s tips and tidbits for UV Safety Month in July:

RAIN, SNOW OR SHINE?

Did you know that there are UVA and UVB rays? 

UVB rays cause sunburns. UVB rays can be deflected somewhat by heavy cloud cover, so people may not get a sunburn on really cloudy days; whereas, on sunny days, they get a sunburn. However, a lot of people don’t know about UVA rays. These rays slice right through cloud cover and reach the earth. 

UVA rays penetrate deeper and can over a period of time and/or repeated exposure can cause cell damage and is what over time can lead to skin cancer, wrinkles, sagging skin (skin laxity), and brown age spots.

That is why it is so important to wear sunscreen every day, whether it’s cloudy or not, even if you are only going to be outside for 10 minutes.

I recommend starting your day by applying a daily moisturizer that has a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 30 in it to any exposed skin surfaces, like the face, ears, neck, upper chest, arms and hands. And protect your eyes by always wearing sunglasses with UV protection lenses when you are outside! 

WHO, WHAT, WHEN and WHERE?

What should you know about sunblock/sunscreen?
  • Children 6 months old and up should wear sunscreen if they are going to be outside.
  • Broad spectrum is importantyou want to block both UVA and UVB rays.
  • SPF of at least 30 (at least 50 spf if you are fair-skinned, blue-eyed, and or red-haired).
  • Apply at least 15 minutes before going outside and reapply every two hours.
  • Apply everywhere that is going to be exposed to UVA or UVB rays.

WEAR PROTECTION!

 What can be worn to further protect yourself and your loved ones from UVA and UVB rays?
  • Hats with a wide brim that shades your face, ears and neck.
  • Sun/swim shirtsI encourage these for all ages, especially for those who will be out on or in the water. You should purchase a new one each year.
  • Zinc-containing sunblock for thinner skinned or more sunburn sensitivity areas like the lips, nose, ears, chest and neck.
  • Sunglasses with UV protection lenses for all ages.

The SKINny on SUNBURNS and TANNING

Are sunburns, tanning or using tanning beds hazardous to your health?
  • A significant sunburn at a young age increases the risk for skin cancer later in life.
  • Sun lamps and tanning beds are known causes of skin cancer. Using a tanning bed just once before the age of 35 increases your risk of skin cancer and melanoma by almost 60%, and the risk increases with each use.
  • UV exposure (without sunscreen) and tanning bed use damages the DNA in your skin’s cells and over time causes premature aging of skin and can damage your eyes (causing issues like cataracts, pterygiums (tissue growth on the eye) and even melanoma on the eye). 

FAMOUS LAST WORDS . . .

Here are other tips and tidbits that I would like you to know:
  • Lead by example. Your kids are always watching and listeningeven though it may not always seem like it😊.
  • Between 10 a.m.-4 p.m. is when UVA and UVB rays are the strongest.
  • Some people may think, “I don’t burn or I tan easily, so I don’t need to wear sunscreen.” No, everyone needs to wear sunscreen. Remember what I said earlier about there being UVA and UVB rays?
  • Come and see me! You should examine your skin monthly and be examined once a year by a medical providermore often if there is a personal or family history of skin cancer.

Promise Community Health Center of Sioux Center is a Federally Qualified Health Center serving the northwest corner of Iowa. Promise provides medical, prenatal, dental, vision, behavioral health and family planning services. To learn more, visit www.promisechc.org and watch this video. To read more Promise news, visit promisechcnews.blogspot.com.


TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT:
Promise Community Health Center is open during the following hours: 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Thursday and 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Promise at 712-722-1700 or visit Promise's website at https://www.promisechc.org/services/set-up-an-appointment.aspx.